The Washington State University Vancouver Catalog

School of Engineering and Computer Science - WSU Vancouver

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective.

School of Engineering and Computer Science - WSU Vancouver

ecs.vancouver.wsu.edu
VECS 201, Vancouver Campus
360-546-9639

Director, H. Gurocak; Associate Professors, X. Chen, T. Karacolak, D. Kim, P. Sekhar, S. Solovitz, S. Wallace, F. Zhao, X. Zhao; Assistant Professors, B. Arigong, Z. Chen, J. H. Kim, S. U. Kim, H. Tan, X. Zhang; Clinical Associate Professors, J. Lynch, H. Rad; Clinical Assistant Professors, P. Bonamy, M. Bozorgi, B. McCamish; Adjunct Faculty, S. Austin, M. Hamilton, H. Holt, D. Lowe, T. Pritchard; Academic Coordinators, K. Deford, E. Walla.

The School of Engineering and Computer Science (ENCS) is an academic unit of the WSU Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture that houses the engineering and computer science programs located at WSU Vancouver.

The undergraduate curricula provide students with a solid foundation upon which they can build to meet the challenges associated with their individual career paths and to adapt to rapidly changing technologies. We emphasize the fundamentals and give students significant choice in designing their academic course of study to meet their career goals. In Computer Science, students can choose from a variety of courses in areas such as intelligent systems, software and hardware systems, graphics and data-intensive computation. In Mechanical Engineering, students can customize their study through four option areas: (1) Micro/nanotechnology; (2) Design and Manufacturing; (3) Mechatronics (robotics and automation); (4) Renewable Energy. The Renewable Energy track is an interdisciplinary option track — available to ECE students and MECH students — incorporating elements of all ENCS disciplines. In Electrical Engineering, students can choose upper division elective courses in computer architecture, integrated circuit design, electronic devices and materials, and others. Effective writing, speaking and presentation skills, and ethics are also emphasized as important attributes of our graduates.

The School of ENCS is located at Washington State University's campus in Vancouver, Washington and is intended to directly serve students in the southwest Washington region. The programs were established and designed to prepare students to satisfy the needs of regional companies and organizations for engineering and computing professionals. The curricula also prepare students for continued education at the graduate level in computer science, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering.

The School offers courses of study leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (BSCS), Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE), Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (BSME), Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS), Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (MSEE), and Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME).

The undergraduate programs in Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org. The undergraduate program in Computer Science is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM

It is the objective of the computer science program to provide a broad education in the science and application of computing. Students are expected to gain proficiency in the design and implementation of software systems, as well as the application of the theory of computing to that process. In addition, all students will develop a background in the hardware architectures that underlie software systems and the mathematics that provide the basis for science and computing. The degree program also requires students to obtain a background in other scientific disciplines and to develop effective communication skills.

Educational Objectives

The goal of our program is to prepare our graduates for successful professional practice and advanced studies by providing a broad education in computer science and by offering the opportunity to deepen their technical understanding in particular areas of computer science through technical electives.

As a graduate of the WSU Vancouver Computer Science program:

  1. You will be a knowledgeable and skilled computer scientist.
  2. You will exhibit the workplace behaviors expected by employers.
  3. You will be committed to high standards of professionalism.
  4. You will adapt to the changing landscape of computer science.

Student Learning Outcomes

Our graduates will have an ability to:

  1. Analyze a complex computing problem and to apply principles of computing and other relevant disciplines to identify solutions.
  2. Design, implement, and evaluate a computing-based solution to meet a given set of computing requirements in the context of the program’s discipline.
  3. Communicate effectively in a variety of professional contexts.
  4. Recognize professional responsibilities and make informed judgments in computing practice based on legal and ethical principles. 
  5. Function effectively as a member or leader of a team engaged in activities appropriate to the program’s discipline.
  6. Apply computer science theory and software development fundamentals to produce computing-based solutions.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM

Electrical Engineering is a diverse field of engineering study encompassing much of the underlying technology of our modern world. Electrical engineers lead the design of microelectronics, computers, tablets, smartphones, communication networks, control systems and power generation and distribution. Aerospace and military systems include major subsystems conceived and designed by electrical engineers.

The lower division electrical engineering curriculum covers the fundamental aspects of the field, emphasizing the theory, principles and knowledge expected of all electrical engineers. The upper division curriculum includes elective courses in topics such as computer architecture, integrated circuit design, electronic devices and materials, and others.

The curriculum incorporates extensive hands-on experiences through laboratory work and design projects. All electrical engineering students participate in a senior design project with a team of students, usually spanning multiple engineering disciplines.

Educational Objectives

The goal of our program is to prepare our graduates for successful professional practice and advanced studies by providing a broad education in electrical engineering and by offering the opportunity to deepen their technical understanding in a particular concentration area of related technical electives. Our graduates will:

  1. Apply technical knowledge and skills as electrical engineers to provide effective solutions in industrial and governmental organizations.
  2. Utilize effective communication, team, and project management skills to work productively within their professions and communities.
  3. Conduct themselves as responsible professionals contributing to the greater benefit of society through technology.
  4. Pursue professional development and/or graduate studies to meet the emerging and evolving demands and increasing responsibilities of a successful career.

Student Learning Outcomes

Our graduates will have an ability to:

  1. Identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics.
  2. Apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors.
  3. Communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  4. Recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts.
  5. Function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives.
  6. Develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions.
  7. Acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM

Mechanical Engineering provides an excellent education for today's technological world. Mechanical engineers are the backbone of the engineering profession and work in every industry from transportation, communications, and electronics to bioengineering, commerce, and manufacturing in business, government, and universities. Mechanical engineers work with motion, energy, and force, and are involved with analyzing and manufacturing the products they design. They design consumer products, develop robotic systems, computer control systems for machinery, commercial jets, instruments for medicine, high performance sporting equipment, and supervise manufacturing operations.

Our undergraduate curriculum covers the fundamental aspects of the field, emphasizes basic principles and their use in solving engineering problems. The upper division course of study focuses on design, manufacturing process, robotics, computer-aided engineering, thermal and fluid systems, mechanics of materials, micro- and nano-device design and manufacturing, and machine integration and automation. The curriculum incorporates hands-on experiences through laboratory work and design projects. The program provides flexibility to students in customizing their study through four option areas:

  • Micro/Nano Technology Option: Provides education in basic semiconductor concepts, fundamentals of microscopic phenomena in microfluidics, micro device fabrication techniques, nano-science and its impact on design of the next generation engineering systems.
  • Design and Manufacturing Option: Emphasizes mechanical system design and realization through computer aided engineering, material failure in mechanical design, and advanced manufacturing.
  • Mechatronics (robotics and automation) Option: Concentrates on design of mechanical systems with electronic and computer controls, automation and robotics.
  • Renewable Energy Option: Includes work in Solar Power, Wind Power, as well as enhanced coursework in other option track courses. The Renewable Energy track is an interdisciplinary option track - available to CS and ECE students as well as MECH students.

Educational Objectives

The goal of our program is to prepare our graduates for successful professional practice and advanced studies by providing a broad education in mechanical engineering and by offering the opportunity to deepen their technical understanding in a particular concentration area of related technical electives. Our graduates will:

  1. Apply technical knowledge and skills as mechanical engineers to provide effective solutions in industrial and government organizations.
  2. Utilize effective communication, team, and project management skills to work productively within their professions and communities.
  3. Conduct themselves in a responsible, professional, and ethical manner.
  4. Continue their education through completion of training courses, workshops, seminars, and/or graduate studies relevant to their professional development.

Student Learning Outcomes

Our graduates will have an ability to:

  1. Identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics.
  2. Apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors.
  3. Communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  4. Recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts.
  5. Function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives.
  6. Develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions.
  7. Acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

Certification in the Major

Certification in a degree program is required by WSU prior to the granting of a baccalaureate degree. Qualification for initial certification, as well as continuation of certified status, will be evaluated based on several criteria including academic integrity, overall grade point average (GPA), GPA in mathematics, science, and major core courses; computer science, electrical engineering, or mechanical engineering. Students will apply for initial certification once the required courses have been completed. Additional details regarding certification in the major are available in the schedules of studies for each major or from the School of ENCS academic coordinators.

Transfer Students

The School of Engineering and Computer Science cooperates closely with Washington community colleges to facilitate the transfer of students into its computer science, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering programs. Students planning to transfer into the School of ENCS are strongly encouraged to contact an ENCS academic coordinator to evaluate the transfer course credits and to help plan the continuation of their academic career at Washington State University Vancouver.

Students will note that a number of the courses offered by the School of ENCS have identical course numbers and similar descriptions to courses offered by the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering on the Pullman campus. The transfer of course credit between these Schools is not automatic or guaranteed. Students intending to take courses in one School for credit in another are advised to consult with the academic coordinator for their degree program, in advance, to assess how the courses may fulfill their degree requirements.

Preparation for Graduate Study

The Master of Science in Computer Science program in the School of ENCS is a thesis program and requires 30 credit hours, including 21 hours of graded course work and 9 credits of thesis research (CS 700). The program has a theme on Cloud Computing a modern and critical set of technologies that span core areas of Computer Science. The coursework and research are in the general areas of computing theory; artificial intelligence; big data; software development; and systems and networks. Sophisticated facilities are available for instruction and research, including a high performance computing cluster and dedicated high-bandwidth network facilities. Teaching and research assistantships are available for qualified students.

Before undertaking graduate study in computer science, the student should have completed a baccalaureate degree substantially similar to the BSCS degree described below in the BSCS schedule of studies. Students from other academic disciplines are encouraged to apply, however such students will be required to take or have taken the equivalent of the following courses: CS 317, CS 360 and CS 450, including all prerequisites for these courses. An undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 is a minimum for admission to the MS program.

The Master of Science in Electrical Engineering program in the School of ENCS is a thesis program and requires a minimum of 30 credit hours. This includes 21 hours of graded coursework beyond the bachelor's degree, plus a minimum of 4 thesis credits (ECE 700). The program has Lab-on-a-Chip theme, which is used as a unifying platform to make connections between courses. The coursework and research are in the general areas of antenna design; RF/microwave systems; Micro/nanoelectronics; MEMS; sensors and signal processing; nanotechnology; electrical power systems; and digital/embedded systems. Our laboratories, including a class-100 clean room and RF laboratories, are equipped with state-of-the-art equipment. Teaching and research assistantships are available for qualified students.

A Bachelor of Science degree from an accredited program in electrical engineering provides a good background for the MSEE graduate program. Students with bachelor degrees in other engineering disciplines, mathematics, and the physical sciences may be admitted, but will be required to make up requisite undergraduate deficiencies. An undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 is a minimum for admission to the MS program.

The Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering program in the School of ENCS is a thesis program and requires a minimum of 30 credit hours. This includes 21 hours of graded coursework beyond the bachelor's degree, plus a minimum of 4 thesis credits (MECH 700). The program has a theme of Digital Designs and Manufacturing a modern and critical set of digital technologies for advanced modeling, simulation, analysis, integration of information technology, sensing, automation, and big data to rapidly design and manufacture products. The coursework and research are in the general areas of product design, sustainable engineering, advanced materials, automation, and new manufacturing processes. Teaching and research assistantships are available for qualified students.

A Bachelor of Science degree from an accredited program in mechanical engineering provides a good background for the MSME graduate program. Students with bachelor degrees in other engineering disciplines, mathematics, and the physical sciences may be admitted, but will be required to make up requisite undergraduate deficiencies. An undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 is a minimum for admission to the MS program.




Schedules of Studies

Honors students complete the Honors College requirements which replace the UCORE requirements.


Bachelor of Science, Computer Science (Vancouver Only) (120 Hours)

Each May the computer science faculty will examine the available capacity in the program and determine the number of new students to be certified for the fall semester. Similarly, the faculty will determine in September the number of additional students to be certified for the spring semester. Students must be certified computer science majors, or minors, to enroll in 300 or 400 level computer science courses. Certification is required by WSU prior to the granting of a baccalaureate degree.

Minimum qualifications for certification in computer science are:
  1. Completion of MATH 171, 172, CS 121, 122, 166, 224, 260, 261, and PHYSICS 201, or their equivalents, with a grade of C or better.
  2. A cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better.
  3. Students must be in good academic standing when they apply for certification with a 2.0 GPA or better in their prior semester’s coursework.

Students applying for certification for the fall semester must submit all necessary transcripts, along with their application for certification, by July 1st. Students applying for certification in the spring semester must submit their application (and necessary transcripts) by November 1st. Applicants will be notified of the decision by July 15th for fall semester applicants, or by November 15th for spring applicants.

If the number of applications for certification exceeds the program’s capacity, the following criteria will be used to select the applicants to be certified:
  1. GPA earned in the courses required for certification
  2. Overall GPA

Students who meet the minimum qualifications for certification, but are denied certification, may appeal the decision. The appeal should describe any special circumstances to be considered. A faculty committee will consider the appeal - the circumstances described, trends in the student’s grades and course load - and make a final decision regarding certification. The appeal must be submitted within 2 weeks of the notification described above. Appeals will be considered and final decisions made by August 1st and January 1st for the fall and spring semesters, respectively. Previously-certified students who become academically deficient under WSU’s academic regulations are subject to decertification.

No courses listed in this schedule of studies may be taken on a pass/fail basis. All listed computer science courses, and their prerequisites, must be completed with a grade of C or better.

Certification Guarantee: Students who have completed the certification courses noted above with an average GPA of at least 3.2, who have an overall GPA of at least 3.2 in the completed courses required in the major, and who have not repeated any required courses, are guaranteed certification.
First Year
First TermHours
CS 1214
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Humanities [HUM]3
MATH 171 [QUAN]4
Second TermHours
CS 1224
CS 1663
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 1724
Second Year
First TermHours
CS 2233
CS 2603
ECONS 101 [SSCI] or 102 [SSCI]3
MATH 2732
PHYSICS 201 [PSCI]4
Second TermHours
Biological Sciences [BSCI] with lab4
CS 2243
CS 2613
MATH 2202
PHYSICS 2024
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermHours
CS 3173
CS 320 [M]3
CS Option Course13
ENGLISH 402 [WRTG]3
STAT 3603
Second TermHours
CS 3513
CS 3553
CS 3604
CS Option Course13
Diversity [DIVR]3
Fourth Year
First TermHours
Arts [ARTS]3
CS 420 [CAPS] [M] 3
CS 4503
CS Option Courses16
Second TermHours
CS 402 [M]3
CS 4213
CS 4273
CS 4603
CS Option Courses13

Footnotes
1CS Option Courses: 15 credit hours of option area courses are required for completion of the degree program. The option courses must be chosen from 300-400-level CS courses and may also include up to 6 hours from the following list: MATH 315, 320, 325, 364, 420, 448, 453, 466, ECE 324, 366, and 424. Other computer science-related courses may be substituted, as approved by the department.

Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering (Vancouver only) (121 Hours)

Students who have completed at least 30 semester hours of course work and who have completed CHEM 105; CS 251; ECE 214, ECE 234, ECE 260, MATH 273, and PHYSICS 202, or their equivalents, are eligible for certification into the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering program. All courses required for certification must be completed with a grade of C or better. Enrollment in many upper-division electrical engineering courses is restricted to certified majors or minors in electrical engineering.

When it becomes necessary to limit enrollment, the overall GPA as well as the GPA for the prerequisite courses listed will be important factors. Students who have not completed all of the prerequisite courses will be placed in a pre-engineering category.

Certification Guarantee: Students who have completed the certification courses noted above with an average GPA of at least 3.2, who have an overall GPA of at least 3.2 in the completed courses required in the major, and who have not repeated any required courses, are guaranteed certification.

No courses listed in this schedule of studies may be taken on a pass/fail basis. All upper-division electrical engineering courses must be completed with a minimum 2.0 average GPA.
First Year
First TermHours
CHEM 105 [PSCI]4
ECE 1012
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Humanities [HUM]3
MATH 171 [QUAN]4
Second TermHours
CS 2514
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 1724
PHYSICS 201 [PSCI]4
Second Year
First TermHours
Biological Sciences [BSCI]3 or 4
ECE 2143
MATH 2202
MATH 2732
PHYSICS 2024
Second TermHours
Diversity [DIVR]3
ECE 2343
ECE 2604
ECONS 101 [SSCI] or 102 [SSCI]3
MATH 3153
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermHours
ECE 3213
ECE 3254
ECE Elective13
ENGLISH 402 [WRTG] 3
STAT 3603
Second TermHours
ECE 3413
ECE 3703
ECE Electives19
Fourth Year
First TermHours
ECE 4113
ECE 4512
ECE Electives19
Second TermHours
Arts [ARTS]3
ECE 405 [M]3
ECE 452 [M] [CAPS]3
ECE Electives16

Footnotes
1ECE Electives must be chosen from CS 330, 466, ECE 302, 316, 324, 327, 349, 366, 414, 421, 424, 425, 461, 462, 466, 471, 476, 477, 483, 496, MECH 441, 467, 468, or be pre-approved by a faculty advisor.

Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering (Vancouver Only) (121 Hours)

Students who have completed at least 30 semester hours of course work and who have completed CHEM 105; MATH 220, 273; MECH 211, 212, 215; and PHYSICS 201 or their equivalents are eligible for certification into the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering program. All courses required for certification must be completed with a grade of C or better. Enrollment in many upper-division mechanical engineering courses is restricted to certified majors or minors in mechanical engineering.

When it becomes necessary to limit enrollment, the overall GPA as well as the GPA for the prerequisite courses listed will be important factors. Students who have not completed all of the prerequisite courses will be placed in a pre-engineering category.

No courses listed in this schedule of studies may be taken on a pass/fail basis. All upper-division mechanical engineering courses must be completed with a minimum 2.0 average GPA.

Certification Guarantee: Students who have completed the certification courses noted above with an average GPA of at least 3.2, who have an overall GPA of at least 3.2 in the completed courses required in the major, and who have not repeated any required courses, are guaranteed certification.
First Year
First TermHours
CHEM 105 [PSCI]4
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
MATH 171 [QUAN]4
MECH 1032
Second TermHours
CHEM 1064
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
Humanities [HUM]3
MATH 1724
MECH 1012
Second Year
First TermHours
ECONS 101 [SSCI] or 102 [SSCI]3
MATH 2202
MATH 2732
MECH 2113
MECH 2512
PHYSICS 201 4
Second TermHours
Biological Sciences [BSCI] 3 or 4
MATH 3153
MECH 2123
MECH 2153
PHYSICS 2024
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermHours
ENGLISH 402 [WRTG]3
MECH 3013
MECH 3033
MECH 3043
MECH 309 [M]3
Second TermHours
MECH 3104
MECH 314 3
MECH 3483
MECH 4043
400-level MECH Option Courses/Technical Electives13
Fourth Year
First TermHours
MECH 4023
MECH 4143
MECH 416 [M]2
400-level MECH Option Courses/Technical Electives16
Second TermHours
Arts [ARTS]3
Diversity [DIVR]3
MECH 417 [CAPS]3
400-level MECH Option Courses/Technical Electives16

Footnotes
1Technical Electives or 400-level MECH Option Courses: The program emphasizes fundamentals and provides flexibility in selecting a course of study through five technical electives. Students can either take any five elective courses (15 credits), provided they meet the prerequisites, or they can choose to take a set of related electives comprising an option area and additional electives of their choice. Students are required to work with their faculty advisor to develop their schedule of studies as they are admitted to the program at the junior level. The following are the technical elective courses and option areas: (Option 1) Micro and Nanotechnology: MECH 431, 435, 438, 450; (Option 2) Design and Manufacturing: MECH 476, 477, 485, 489; (Option 3) Mechatronics: MECH 405, 467, 468; (Option 4) Renewable Energy: MECH 441, ECE 421, choice of two courses from MECH 405, 431, 439, 442, 450, 468.


Minors

Mechanical Engineering Minor

A mechanical engineering minor requires a minimum of 16 semester hours, 9 of which must be in upper-division course work and taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.  This minor requires (1) MECH 211 and 212, (2) Four out of the following MECH 215, 303, 309, 314, 348, 431, 438, 441, 450, 467, or 468.  At least one of these four courses must be MECH 215, 303, or 348.  All prerequisites for minor courses must be met.  All courses must be completed with a minimum 2.0 average GPA.


Electrical Engineering (Vancouver only)

Students majoring in other disciplines may elect to obtain a minor in electrical engineering. The minor in electrical engineering consists of 20 credit hours that must include ECE 214, 260, 321, 325, and any two of ECE 324, 341, 349, 366, 370, 411, 414, 424, 461, or 462. Though it is not required, students may choose their two optional courses in the following concentrations:

  • VLSI design: ECE 349 and 366
  • Digital signal processing: ECE 341 and 414
  • Computer engineering: ECE 324 and 424
  • Power systems: ECE 461 and 462

All minor courses, except ECE 214, 260, 321 and 341, must be taken in residence at WSU Vancouver. The University requires at least 9 credit hours for any minor be 300-400-level and taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. All prerequisites for minor courses must be met. All minor courses must be completed with a minimum 2.0 GPA.


Computer Science (Vancouver only)

The minor in computer science consists of 21 credit hours, 10 of which must be 300-400-level courses taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. Required courses include CS 121 or 251, 122, 224, 360, and two (6 credits minimum) 300-400 level CS courses, excluding CS 402.  All courses must be completed with a grade of C or better and all course prerequisites must be met.  The minor course of study must be pre-approved by the computer science academic coordinator.



Courses

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective. Courses showing two entries of the same number indicate that the course information is changing. The most recently approved version is shown first, followed by the older version, in gray, with its last-effective term preceding the course title. Courses shown in gray with only one entry of the course number are being discontinued. Course offerings by term can be accessed by clicking on the term links when viewing a specific campus catalog.


Computer Science - Vancouver (CS)

Fall 2019 Spring 2020 

Enrollment in 400-level computer science courses is restricted to certified majors or minors in computer science and to juniors and seniors officially certified in other degree programs requiring these computer science courses.


115 Introduction to Data Analytics 3 Basic concepts, principles, and tools used in data analytics. (Crosslisted course offered as CPT S 115, CS 115, STAT 115).

121 Program Design and Development 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: MATH 171 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. Formulation of problems and top-down design of programs in a modern structured language for their solution on a digital computer. Typically offered Fall.

122 Data Structures 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: CS 121 with a C or better, or CS 251 with a C or better. Advanced programming techniques: data structures, recursion, sorting and searching, and basics of algorithm analysis. Typically offered Spring.

166 Discrete Mathematics 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 122 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; MATH 171 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. Introduction to the theoretical foundations of computing. Combinatorics, relations, trees, graphs, Boolean algebra, proof methods, and discrete probability as applied to computer science.

215 Data Analytics Systems and Algorithms 3 Course Prerequisite: CPT S 122, CPT S 132, or CS 122. Exploration of fundamental concepts, constructs, and techniques of modern data analytics systems. (Crosslisted course offered as CPT S 215, CS 215).

223 Advanced Data Structures 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 122 with a C or better; CS 166 with a C or better. Advanced data structures, object oriented programming concepts, and program design principles. Typically offered Fall.

224 Programming Tools 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 122 with a C or better. Debugging tools, scripting languages, UNIX programming tools, introduction to graphical user interface programming. Typically offered Spring.

251 C Programming for Engineers 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: MATH 171 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. Introduction to the C programming language and application to engineering problem solving; introduction to data structures, sorting and searching; laboratory use of integrated development environments and debugging tools. Typically offered Spring.

260 Computer Organization 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 122 with a C or better. Introduction to computer architecture, data representation, design and analysis of instruction sets, implementation of machine instructions, virtual memory and multiprocessing. Typically offered Fall.

261 C and Assembly Language Programming 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 260 with a C or better. C language concepts, professional practices and C programming; module linkage; assembly language concepts and programming. Typically offered Spring.

315 Introduction to Data Mining 3 Course Prerequisite: CPT S 215, 223, 233, or CS 315, with a C or better; certified major or minor in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Software Engineering, or Data Analytics. The process of automatically extracting valid, useful, and previously unknown information from large repositories. (Crosslisted course offered as CPT S 315, CS 315).

317 Automata and Formal Languages 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 122 with a C or better; CS 166 with a C or better; certified major in Computer Science. Finite automata, regular sets, pushdown automata, context-free language, Turing machines and the halting problem. Typically offered Fall.

320 [M] Fundamentals of Software Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 166 with a C or better; CS 224 with a C or better; certified major in Computer Science. Introduction to software engineering; requirements analysis, definition and specification; software process models; prototyping; architecture; object-oriented design with UML. Typically offered Fall.

320 (Effective through Summer 2019) [M] Fundamentals of Software Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 166 with a C or better; CS 224 with a C or better; ENGLISH 402 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; certified major in Computer Science. Introduction to software engineering; requirements analysis, definition and specification; software process models; prototyping; architecture; object-oriented design with UML. Typically offered Fall.

330 Numerical Computing 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 251 with a C or better, or CS 261 with a C or better; MATH 172 or 182 with a C or better; MATH 220 with a C or better; certified major in Computer Science. Power and limitation of numerical solutions; design, analysis and implementation of numerical algorithms; visualization and rendering. Typically offered Fall.

351 Introduction to Database Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 223 with a C or better; CS 224 with a C or better; certified major in Computer Science. Introduction to database concepts, data models, database languages, database design, implementation issues. Typically offered Spring.

355 Programming Language Design 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 223 with a C or better; CS 224 with a C or better; certified major in Computer Science. Design concepts of high-level programming languages; survey of existing languages, experience using some languages. Typically offered Spring.

360 Systems Programming 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: CS 224 with a C or better; CS 251 with a C or better, or CS 261 with a C or better; certified major in Computer Science. Implementation of systems programs, concepts of computer operating systems; laboratory experience in using operating system facilities. Typically offered Spring.

402 [M] Social and Professional Issues in Computer Science 3 Course Prerequisite: ENGLISH 402 or 403; certified major in Computer Science. Social, legal, ethical and professional issues that arise in the context of computing. Typically offered Spring.

415 Big Data 3 Course Prerequisite: CPT S 215, 223, or 233, with a C or better; certified major or minor in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Software Engineering, or Data Analytics. Big data models, databases and query languages, modern distributed database systems and algorithms. (Crosslisted course offered as CPT S 415, CS 415).

420 [CAPS] Software Design Project I 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 320 with a C or better; CS 360 with a C or better; senior standing. Development of software in a team environment; project management; unit and integration testing, bug tracking, configuration management, software process models; object-oriented design with UML. Typically offered Fall.

421 Software Design Project II 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: CS 420 with a C or better; senior standing. Large-scale software development in a team environment; software design and implementation, project management, testing and integration; teamwork skills, communication, source code management, documentation and presentations. Continuation and completion of CS 420 project. Typically offered Spring.

424 [CAPS] [M] Data Analytics Capstone 3 Course Prerequisite: CPT S/CS 315; STAT 360; STAT 436 or concurrent enrollment; CPT S 451/CS 351 or concurrent enrollment; certified major in Data Analytics; junior standing. Team-based project that integrates the main aspects of data analytics. (Crosslisted course offered as CPT S 424, CS 424, STAT 424).

425 Digital Forensics 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 360 with a C or better. Use of computers in the investigation of criminal and civil incidents in which computers or computer technology play a significant or interesting role. Typically offered Spring.

426 Applied Systems Security 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 224 with a C or better; CS 261 with a C or better; certified major in Computer Science. Foundations, theory, and practice of non-cryptographic computer security; design of secure software; adding security to existing systems; other contemporary topics in security. Typically offered Fall.

426 (Effective through Summer 2019) Applied Systems Security 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 224 with a C or better; CS 261 with a C or better; certified major in Computer Science. Foundations, theory, and practice of non-cryptographic computer security; design of secure software; adding security to existing systems; other contemporary topics in security. Typically offered Fall.

427 Cryptography and Network Security 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 166 with a C or better; CS 360 with a C or better. Computer security concepts, models and mechanism; encryption technology, formal models, policy and ethical implications. Credit not granted for both CS 427 and CS 527. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

427 (Effective through Summer 2019) Computer Security 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 166 with a C or better; CS 360 with a C or better. Computer security concepts, models and mechanism; encryption technology, formal models, policy and ethical implications. Credit not granted for both CS 427 and CS 527. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

440 Artificial Intelligence 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 320 with a C or better; STAT 212 with a C or better or STAT 360 with a C or better. Knowledge representation and automated problem solving; theory and application of agent programming. Typically offered Spring.

442 Computer Graphics 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 223 with a C or better; CS 320 with a C or better; MATH 220 with a C or better. Raster operations; transformations and viewing; geometric modeling; visibility and shading; color. Credit not granted for both CS 442 and CS 542. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

443 Human-Computer Interaction 3 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Computer Science; junior standing. Introduction to the field of human-computer interaction; understanding the system user; user-centered design and evaluation techniques including heuristic evaluation and usability testing. Typically offered Spring.

447 Computer Game Design 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 223 with a C or better; CS 320 with a C or better. Design and implementation of computer games. Credit not granted for both CS 447 and CS 547. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

450 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 223 with a C or better; STAT 360 with a C or better; certified major in Computer Science. Analysis of data structures and algorithms; computational complexity and design of efficient data-handling procedures. Typically offered Fall.

452 Compiler Design 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 317 with a C or better; CS 355 with a C or better. Design of lexical analyzers, syntactic analyzers, intermediate code generators, code optimizers and object code generators. Typically offered Spring.

453 Cloud Data Management 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 351 with a C or better. Principles of cloud data management: data models, fragmentation, processing paradigms, consistency, storage, and commercial cloud data management platforms. Typically offered Fall.

455 Introduction to Computer Networks 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 360 with a C or better. Concepts and implementation of computer networks; architectures, protocol layers, internetworking and addressing case studies. Typically offered Fall.

458 Mobile Application Development 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 360 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. Design and development of mobile applications; introduction to mobile application frameworks, including user interface, sensors, event handling, data management and network communication. Typically offered Spring.

460 Operating Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: CS 360 with a C or better. Role and purpose of operating systems, process and memory management, I/O device management and drivers, file system concepts and design. Typically offered Spring.

466 Embedded Systems 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: CS 360 with a C or better, or ECE 370 with a C or better; senior standing. Design and development of real-time and dedicated software systems with an introduction to sensors and actuators. Credit not granted for both CS 466 and CS 566. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

483 Topics in Computer Science V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Computer Science. Current topics in computer science or software engineering. Typically offered Spring.

487 Software Design and Architecture 3 Course Prerequisite: CPT S 321 with a C or better; CPT S 322 with a C or better; certified major or minor in Computer Sci, Computer Engr, Electrical Engr, Software Engr, or Data Analytics. Enrollment not allowed if credit already earned for CPT S 323. Software design; design principles, patterns, and anti-patterns; design quality attributes and evaluation; architectural styles, architectural patterns and anti-patterns. Credit not granted for both CPT S 487 and CPT S 587, or for both CPT S 487 and 323. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

501 Cloud Systems 3 Fundamental concepts of cloud computing and their applications within commercial systems; exposure to current research topics in this area. Typically offered Fall.

515 Advanced Algorithms 3 Advanced algorithms and data structures, design and analysis, intractability.

516 Theory of Computation 3 Discrete structures, automata, formal languages, recursive functions, algorithms, computability, and complexity. Required preparation must include a strong background in discrete mathematics, automata, and formal languages. Typically offered Fall.

518 Advanced Analysis of Algorithms 3 Advanced Study in design and analysis of algorithms, including randomized and approximation algorithms, linear programming, network flow and string matching. Typically offered Fall.

521 Software Engineering Analysis 3 Research in software engineering; application of quantitative techniques in the software life cycle; current software engineering literature; exploration of techniques of mathematical modeling and solutions to software engineering problems. Required preparation must include a familiarity with the use and theory behind current software engineering practices. Typically offered Fall.

527 Cryptography and Network Security 3 Computer security concepts, models and mechanism; encryption technology, formal models, policy and ethical implications. Credit not granted for both CS 427 and CS 527. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

527 (Effective through Summer 2019) Computer Security 3 Computer security concepts, models and mechanism; encryption technology, formal models, policy and ethical implications. Credit not granted for both CS 427 and CS 527. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

541 Artificial Intelligence 3 Intelligent computer programs; simulation of cognitive processes. Required preparation must include prior knowledge and experience in artificial intelligence. Typically offered Spring.

542 Computer Graphics 3 Raster operations; transformations and viewing; geometric modeling; visibility and shading; color. Credit not granted for both CS 442 and CS 542. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

547 Computer Game Design 3 Design and implementation of computer games. Credit not granted for both CS 447 and CS 547. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

548 Advanced Computer Graphics 3 Solid modeling, visual realism, light and color models, advanced surface generation techniques. Required preparation must include a prior knowledge and understanding of linear algebra and the graphics pipeline. Typically offered Spring.

558 Wireless Sensor Networks 3 Design and implementation of sensor networks. Required preparation must include a prior knowledge and understanding of communication protocols such as TCP/IP and experience in network programming. Typically offered Spring.

563 Concurrent Programming 3 Multithreaded programming; parallel programming; distributed programming; theory of concurrency; synchronization techniques; libraries and tools. Typically offered Spring.

564 Distributed Systems 3 Distributed systems concepts; distributed systems models; socket programming; remote procedure call; distributed file systems; transactions and concurrency control; fault tolerance. Typically offered Spring.

565 File and Storage Systems 3 Design and implementation of file and storage systems, introduction of the architecture and characteristics of the components on which storage systems are built. Typically offered Spring.

566 Embedded Systems 3 (2-3) Design and development of real-time and dedicated software systems with an introduction to sensors and actuators. Credit not granted for both CS 466 and CS 566. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

570 Machine Learning 3 Introduction to building computer systems that learn from their experience; classification and regression problems; unsupervised and reinforcement learning.

580 Advanced Topics in Computer Science 3 May be repeated for credit. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

582 Software Testing 3 Software testing, testing levels, testing objectives, testing techniques.

595 Directed Study in Computer Science V 1 (0-3) to 3 (0-9) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 3 hours. Current topics in computer science. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.


Electrical Engineering - Vancouver (ECE)

Fall 2019 Spring 2020 

Enrollment in many upper-level electrical engineering courses is restricted to certified majors or minors in electrical engineering.


101 Introduction to Electrical Engineering 2 (1-3) Course Prerequisite: MATH 106 or a minimum ALEKS math placement score of 80%. Introduction to the field of electrical engineering and the fundamental concepts behind electronic devices and systems. Typically offered Fall.

214 Design of Logic Circuits 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 101; MATH 106 or a minimum ALEKS math placement score of 80%. Design and application of combinational logic circuits with exposure to modern methods and design tools; introduction to sequential logic circuits. Typically offered Fall.

234 Microprocessor Systems 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: CS 251 or CS 261; ECE 214. Microprocessor system architecture, instruction sets and interfacing; assembly language programming. Typically offered Spring.

260 Circuit Modeling and Analysis I 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 101; MATH 315 or concurrent enrollment. Circuit modeling, analysis, component models, theory and simulation tools; application of network theory to solve linear and nonlinear circuits under static and dynamic operation. Typically offered Spring.

295 Digital Communications I 3 Course Prerequisite: ECE 214; ECE 260 or concurrent enrollment. Hardware and protocols for digital communications systems; Ethernet, ATM, physical and media access layer; encoding and modulation techniques.

302 Properties of Electronic Materials 3 Course Prerequisite: CHEM 105; PHYS 202. Schrodinger's wave equation, potential barrier problems, crystal structure and bonds, band theory of solids, semiconductors, super conductor, dielectric and magnetic material properties. Typically offered Spring.

316 Nanotechnology for Semiconductor and Renewable Energy Applications 3 Course Prerequisite: CHEM 105; PHYSICS 202. Scaling laws, nanofabrication, nanomaterials, nanoscale characterization; nanotechnology in semiconductor industry, critical dimension, solar cells, fuel cells, energy storage, batteries, energy efficiency and energy savings. Typically offered Spring.

321 Circuit Modeling and Analysis II 3 Course Prerequisite: ECE 260; MATH 315. Magnetically coupled circuits, frequency response, Laplace transforms, Fourier analysis, and two port networks. Typically offered Fall.

324 Digital Systems Design 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 214. Implementation of datapaths and controllers, use of hardware description languages and automated synthesis tools, field programmable gate arrays and simulation. Typically offered Spring.

325 Electronic Devices and Applications 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 214; ECE 260. MOS small and large signal models, bipolar transistors, biasing and parasitics, amplifier design and feedback, frequency response; circuit simulation and device models. Typically offered Fall.

327 Introduction to Power Electronics 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 321; ECE 325. Power semiconductors, high-frequency magnetics, and their application to switch-mode power converters, electric motor drives, and utility systems. Typically offered Spring.

341 Signals and Systems 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 321. Discrete and continuous systems, sampling, convolution, Fourier and Z transforms, random signals. Typically offered Spring.

345 Digital Communications II 3 Course Prerequisite: ECE 295; STAT 360 or concurrent enrollment. Digitally modulated signals and their spectral characteristics, modulation/demodulation techniques, coherent/non-coherent detection methods; source and channel coding, spread-spectrum and multiple access techniques.

349 Principles of Solid State Devices 3 Course Prerequisite: ECE 325 or concurrent enrollment; CHEM 105; PHYSICS 202. Semiconductor theory; carrier diffusion and drift, direct and indirect energy materials, homo and hetereojunctions, operations principles of bipolar junctions and MOS field effect transistors, metal-semiconductor contacts. Typically offered Fall.

366 Introduction to VLSI Design 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 214; ECE 349. CMOS devices and deep-submicron fabrication technology; interconnect modeling, power and clock distribution, area, power and speed optimization. Typically offered Spring.

370 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves 3 Course Prerequisite: ECE 260; MATH 315. Electrostatic and magnetostatic fields; Faraday's laws, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic properties of matter, uniform plane waves and transmission lines. Typically offered Spring.

405 [M] Professional Issues and Ethics in Electrical Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: ENGLISH 402; certified major in Electrical Engineering. Social, legal and professional issues that arise in the context of electrical engineering. Typically offered Spring.

411 Energy Systems 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 321. Investigation and analysis of the design, tradeoffs and efficiency of conventional and alternative energy sources; energy transmission, storage and conversion systems. Typically offered Fall.

414 Introduction to Digital Signal Processing 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 341. Discrete and fast Fourier Transforms, Z-Transform, sampling, discrete convolution, digital filter design and effects of quantization. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

421 Introduction to Solar Cells 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: PHYSICS 202. Materials, structures, and devices used in renewable energy systems with the focus on solar cells. Typically offered Fall.

424 Computer Architecture and Design 3 Course Prerequisite: ECE 234 or CS 261. Architecture, organization and design of modern digital computers; instruction sets, computer arithmetic, pipelining, memory hierarchy, storage and input/output topics. Typically offered Fall.

425 RF Devices and Circuits 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 341; ECE 370. Semiconductor devices and circuit design targeting wireless applications. Typically offered Fall.

451 Capstone Design I 2 Course Prerequisite: ECE 325; ECE 370; ENGLISH 402; senior standing; certified major in Electrical Engineering. First of a two-course senior design project sequence; design for manufacture, schedule estimation and tracking, costing, ethics and proposal writing. Typically offered Fall.

452 [CAPS] [M] Capstone Design II 3 Course Prerequisite: ECE 451; senior standing. Execution phase of the senior design project course sequence; independent or team project proposed in ECE 451 is designed and implemented. Typically offered Spring.

461 Power Systems Analysis and Design I 3 Course Prerequisite: ECE 370. Basic components and their representations in power systems, power transformers, and transmission lines. Typically offered Fall.

462 Power Systems Analysis and Design II 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 461. Power flow, symmetrical faults, symmetrical components, unsymmetrical faults, and transient stability, the computer simulation software application in power systems analysis. Typically offered Spring.

462 (Effective through Spring 2019) Power Systems Analysis and Design II 3 Course Prerequisite: ECE 461. Power flow, symmetrical faults, symmetrical components, unsymmetrical faults, and transient stability, the computer simulation software application in power systems analysis. Typically offered Spring.

466 Semiconductor Material and Device Characterization 3 Course Prerequisite: ECE 349. Modern semiconductor material and device characterization techniques; electrical, optical, and physical characterization methods commonly used in semiconductor industry. Typically offered Fall.

471 Antenna Design and Analysis 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 370. Antenna types and radiation, wire antennas, antenna arrays broadband and aperture antennas; theory and simulation of antenna performance, laboratory testing and measurement. Typically offered Spring.

475 Electro-optical Devices and Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: ECE 370; STAT 360. Electromagnetic reflection and refraction, waveguide theory; theory and application of optical source and sensor devices; coupling, dispersion and loss in waveguides and optical fiber.

476 Computer-aided Design for VLSI 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 324; ECE 366. Algorithms and design flows for VLSI design synthesis and verification.

477 VLSI Testing and Design for Test 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 324; ECE 366. Test pattern generation for digital devices, controllability and observability; tester characteristics and capabilities; fault modeling and analysis of test coverage; built-in self-test techniques.

483 Topics in Electrical Engineering V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 9 hours. Course Prerequisite: Junior standing; certified major in Electrical Engineering. Current topics in electrical engineering. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

486 (Effective through Summer 2020) Solid State Device Design and Modeling 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 349. Design and modeling of solid-state devices such as PN diode. BJT and MOSFET. Simulation and of device design using CAD tools such as ATLAS and ATHENA for physical modeling and fabrication process integration. Typically offered Fall.

495 Wireless and Mobile Communications Systems 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 345; ECE 414; ECE 425. Wireless communication emphasizing cellular and multiple access communication; RF environment, duplexing and multiple access, cellular, mobile systems, standards and applications; wireless ad hoc networks.

496 Silicon Integrated Circuit Design Technology 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ECE 349. Hands-on experience in design, fabrication, characterization, and testing of monolithic silicon devices and integrated circuits; completion of a design project. Typically offered Spring.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: By permission only. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

501 Fundamentals of Laboratory-on-Chip 3 Operating principles of laboratory-on-chip (LoC) technologies, basics of design and fabrication, integration with microdevices, digital and high-frequency circuits, sensors, and power systems. Typically offered Spring.

522 High Voltage Engineering 3 High voltage engineering concepts and techniques that facilitate design, research, and development of modern electric power apparatus and interconnected components.

525 Experimental Methods for Electrical Engineering 3 Design of experiments; data analysis methods; statistical testing; dynamic measurements; uncertainty analysis, yield concepts; data acquisition; probability distributions; and report writing. Recommended preparation: basic statistics knowledge. Typically offered Fall.

533 Advanced Antenna Design 3 Advanced antenna types and design methods, small antennas, reconfigurable antennas, wideband microstrip antennas, millimeter-wave antennas, phased arrays, design of array feed, mutual coupling, system level implications such as full-duplex and MIMO. Recommended preparation: ECE 370; ECE 471. Typically offered Fall.

536 Power Systems Economics and Electricity Markets 3 Economic dispatch and optimal power flow; electricity market; short-term load forecasting; electricity price forecasting; price-based unit commitment; arbitrage in electricity markets; market power analysis.

537 High Frequency Circuit Design 3 Active microwave components (diodes, transistors); microwave transistor amplifiers; oscillators; mixers; stability criteria and circles; noise in microwave circuits; noise figure. Recommended preparation: ECE 370; ECE 425. Typically offered Fall.

543 Advanced Hardware Verification 3 Contemporary methods of functional hardware verification for complex digital designs, including functional simulation, coverage metrics, event and assertion-based verification, property specification language, and formal verification techniques. Recommended preparation: ECE 324. Typically offered Fall.

569 Advanced Power Electronics 3 Advanced design, analysis, modeling, and verification of applied power electronics and related control systems. Recommended preparation: ECE 327. Typically offered Spring.

576 Sensors 3 (2-3) Classification of sensors, sensing modalities, comparison; figures of merit; sensing parameters; sensor miniaturization; sensor manufacturing; and case study: Pressure sensor, gas sensor, temperature sensor, and biosensor. Required preparation: Circuit analysis. Typically offered Fall.

586 Solid State Device Design and Modeling 3 Design and modeling of solid-state devices such as PN diode, BJT, and MOSFET; Simulation and device design using TCAD tools for physical modeling and fabrication process integration. Recommended preparation: Basic semiconductor physics. Typically offered Spring.

595 Directed Study in Electrical Engineering V 1 (0-3) to 3 (0-9) May be repeated for credit. Current topics in electrical engineering. (Crosslisted course offered as E E 595 and ECE 595.)

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.


Mechanical Engineering - Vancouver (MECH)

Fall 2019 Spring 2020 

Enrollment in many upper-level mechanical engineering courses is restricted to certified majors or minors in mechanical engineering.


101 Introduction to Mechanical Engineering 2 Course Prerequisite: MATH 106 and MATH 108, or concurrent enrollment, or MATH 171 or concurrent enrollment. Introduction to mechanical engineering profession, engineering problem solving, computers in engineering design methods. Typically offered Spring.

103 Engineering Graphics 2 (1-3) Orthographic theory, conventions, and visualization; isometric and oblique pictorials; geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, computer-aided drafting and solid modeling. Typically offered Fall.

211 Statics 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 172 or 182 or concurrent enrollment; PHYSICS 201 or concurrent enrollment. Static equilibrium analysis of particles and rigid bodies, free-body diagrams, moment diagrams, friction, center of gravity, moments of inertia. Typically offered Fall.

212 Dynamics 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 211. Kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies; Newton's second law of motion; work-energy concept; impulse and momentum. Typically offered Spring.

215 Mechanics of Materials 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 211. Concepts of stress, strain, and their relationships; axial, torsion, bending, and combined stresses; properties of materials; columns and strain energy method. Typically offered Spring.

251 Numerical Computing for Engineers 2 Course Prerequisite: MATH 172 or 182; MATH 220 or concurrent enrollment. Introduction to numerical computing in the context of problem solving including data analysis, data visualization, MATLAB programming and numerical techniques. Typically offered Fall.

301 Thermodynamics 3 Course Prerequisite: PHYSICS 201. Thermodynamic properties of matter, ideal and real gases, work and heat, first and second laws and their application to engineering systems. Typically offered Fall.

303 Fluid Mechanics 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 212. Physical properties, fluid statics, laminar and turbulent flow, impulse and momentum, similitude, pipe flow, boundary layers, lift, drag and measurement techniques, fluid experimentations. Recommended preparation: MATH 315. Typically offered Fall.

304 Introduction to Electronic Circuits 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 315 or concurrent enrollment; PHYSICS 202. Introduction to DC and AC circuits, analog electronic components, digital circuits, and engineering measurements. Typically offered Fall.

309 [M] Introduction of Engineering Materials 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: MECH 215; CHEM 105 or concurrent enrollment; PHYSICS 201 or concurrent enrollment. Structure of materials, phase equilibrium, phase transformations, mechanical failure, and mechanical properties; materials testing laboratory. Typically offered Fall.

310 Introduction to Design and Manufacturing 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: MECH 103; MECH 309; Certified major in Mechanical Engineering. Basic mechanical engineering drawing; shaping and non-shaping manufacturing processes; exposure to 3D-CAD; manufacturing processes laboratory. Typically offered Spring.

314 Machine Design I 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 215; MECH 309; certified major in Mechanical Engineering. Design process, factor of safety, stress-deformation, combined stresses, curved members; deformation analysis, static and fatigue failure theories; design of mechanical elements, stress analysis and finite elements; shafts and coupling design. Typically offered Spring.

348 Dynamics Systems and Control 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 212; MECH 251; MATH 315; certified major in Mechanical Engineering. Modeling and analysis of dynamic systems, including mechanical, electrical, fluid, and thermal systems. Fundamentals of vibration analysis, control systems. Typically offered Spring.

402 Thermal Systems Design 3 (1-6) Course Prerequisite: MECH 404. Design and analysis of thermal-fluid systems using principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer, thermal experimentations. Typically offered Fall.

404 Heat Transfer 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 220; MATH 315; MECH 301; MECH 303; Certified major in Mechanical Engineering. Fundamentals of conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer; analytical, numerical, and empirical modeling for solids, liquids, and gases. Typically offered Spring.

405 Introduction to Microcontrollers 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 304. Microcontroller architecture, microcontroller programming, mechanical system design with embedded microcontrollers. Typically offered Spring.

414 Machine Design II 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 215; MECH 309; MECH 314; Certified major in Mechanical Engineering. Static and fatigue failure theories applied to design of mechanical elements, stress analysis and finite elements; design for fatigue life of various mechanical elements, design and selection of standard mechanical components, and design of clutches and brakes. Typically offered Fall.

416 [M] Mechanical Systems Design I 2 Course Prerequisite: MECH 310; MECH 404; MECH 414 or concurrent enrollment. First term of the year-long capstone design; integrative design in mechanical engineering; multidisciplinary design project considering technical and nontechnical contexts. Typically offered Fall.

417 [CAPS] Mechanical Systems Design II 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 416; junior standing. Second term of the year-long capstone design; integrative design in mechanical engineering; multidisciplinary design project considering technical and nontechnical contexts. Typically offered Spring.

431 Semiconductor Devices 3 Course Prerequisite: CHEM 105; PHYSICS 202. Crystal properties, energy bands, semiconductor charge carriers, p-n junctions, field-effect transistors, bipolar junction transistors, optoelectronic devices, integrated circuits. Typically offered Spring.

435 Introduction to Microfluidics 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 315; MECH 303. Overview of microfluidics, scaling laws, intermolecular forces, surface tension, passive scalar transport, electrowetting, electrokinetics, dielectrophoresis, microfabrication. Typically offered Fall.

438 Microfabrication Technology 3 Course Prerequisite: CHEM 105; MATH 315; PHYSICS 202. Microelectronic fabrication technology, semiconductor material, diffusion, thermal oxidation, ion implantation, lithography, etching, thin film deposition, CMOS integration and MEMS. Credit not granted for both MECH 438 and MECH 538. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

439 Foundations of Aerodynamics 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 315; MECH 303. Governing equations of fluid mechanics, potential flow, introduction to aerodynamics, thin airfoil theory, compressible flow, viscous effects. Typically offered Fall.

441 Fundamentals of Renewable Energy 3 Course Prerequisite: PHYSICS 202; MATH 273. An examination of the fundamentals and the impact of renewable energy technology, including wind, solar, hydroelectricity, and alternate fuels. Typically offered Spring.

442 Advanced Thermal Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 404. Analysis and design of advanced thermal systems at macro, mini and micro scales; applied design software packages; design projects. Credit not granted for both MECH 442 and MECH 542. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

450 Advanced Topics in Micro and Nano Technology 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: CHEM 106; PHYSICS 202. Microfabrication technology, bulk and surface micromachining, sensors and actuators, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), nanofabrication technology, micro/nano scale material and device measurements. Credit not granted for both MECH 450 and MECH 550. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

467 Automation 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: MECH 304 and 348, OR ECE 260. Design of automation systems, motion control, programmable logic. Credit not granted for both MECH 467 and MECH 567. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

468 Robotics 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 304 and 348, OR ECE 260. Industrial robots, kinematics, control, robot programming, interfacing, sensors, actuators, vision systems and mobile robots. Credit not granted for both MECH 468 and MECH 568. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

476 Advanced Manufacturing Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 310. Advanced topics in manufacturing processes, including interrelationships between the properties of the material, the manufacturing process and design of components. Credit not granted for both MECH 476 and MECH 576. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

477 Manufacturing for Polymer Composites 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 309. Polymeric materials and their composites; various manufacturing processes; transport phenomena in composite manufacturing; process modeling and design. Typically offered Fall.

483 Topics in Mechanical Engineering V 1-4 Current topics in Mechanical Engineering.

485 Computer-aided Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 215; MECH 310 or concurrent enrollment. Introduction to the use of finite element techniques in engineering product design and analysis; basic concepts and applications in CAE. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

489 Material Failure in Mechanical Design 3 Course Prerequisite: MECH 215; MECH 309. Analysis, design and prevention from failure of materials in mechanical design; mechanical behavior of materials such as fatigue, fracture and wear. Credit not granted for both MECH 489 and MECH 589. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

501 Digital Design and Manufacturing 3 Fundamentals of digital design and manufacturing; exposure to current research topics in the area. Typically offered Fall.

509 MEMS Engineering 3 (2-3) Introduction to the design, fabrication and application of microelectromechanical systems.

515 Advanced Heat Transfer 3 Energy conservation equations; forced convection with internal and external flow, free convection, boiling and condensation, mass transfer, numerical methods.

516 Micro/Nanoscale Thermal Engineering 3 Fundamentals and applications of micro/nanoscale thermal science and engineering.

521 Fundamentals of Fluids I 3 Mass and momentum conservation equations, Navier-Stokes equations, compressible flows, inviscid-potential flows, advanced viscous flows including boundary layer numerical methods.

523 Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer 3 Partial differential equation systems, finite difference method, stability analysis, methods for wave equation, heat equation, Laplace equation, finite volume method. Typically offered Fall.

529 Experimental Methods for Mechanical Engineering Research 3 Research methods for mechanical engineers, including experimental design, techniques, analysis, and presentation. Typically offered Spring.

532 Finite Elements 3 Theory of finite elements; applications to general engineering systems considered as assemblages of discrete elements.

538 Microfabrication Technology 3 Microelectronic fabrication technology, semiconductor material, diffusion, thermal oxidation, ion implantation, lithography, etching, thin film deposition, CMOS integration and MEMS. Credit not granted for both MECH 438 and MECH 538. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

540 Advanced Dynamics 3 Newtonian dynamics, rotating coordinate systems; Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, gyroscopic mechanics, other applications.

542 Advanced Thermal Systems 3 Analysis and design of advanced thermal systems at macro, mini and micro scales; applied design software packages; design projects. Credit not granted for both MECH 442 and MECH 542. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

550 Advanced Topics in Micro and Nano Technology 3 (2-3) Microfabrication technology, bulk and surface micromachining, sensors and actuators, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), nanofabrication technology, micro/nano scale material and device measurements. Credit not granted for both MECH 450 and MECH 550. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

567 Automation 3 (2-3) Design of automation systems, motion control, programmable logic. Credit not granted for both MECH 467 and MECH 567. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

568 Robotics 3 Industrial robots, kinematics, control, robot programming, interfacing, sensors, actuators, vision systems and mobile robots. Credit not granted for both MECH 468 and MECH 568. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

576 Advanced Manufacturing Engineering 3 Advanced topics in manufacturing processes, including interrelationships between the properties of the material, the manufacturing process and design of components. Credit not granted for both MECH 476 and MECH 576. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

579 Advanced Topics in Design and Manufacturing V 1-3 May be repeated for credit.

585 Computer-aided Engineering 3 Introduction to the use of finite element techniques in engineering product design and analysis; basic concepts and applications in CAE. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

589 Material Failure in Mechanical Design 3 Analysis, design and prevention from failure of materials in mechanical design; mechanical behavior of materials such as fatigue, fracture and wear. Credit not granted for both MECH 489 and MECH 589. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

598 Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit. Current research interests. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

Student Affairs Schedules of Classes Commencement Veteran's Affairs Summer Session
 
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