The Washington State University Catalog

Program in Agricultural and Food Systems

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective.

Program in Agricultural and Food Systems

afs.wsu.edu
Hulbert Hall 423
509-335-8406

Agricultural and Food Systems Program Director and Professor, D. Layne; Animal Sciences Department Chair and Professor, K. Johnson; Crop and Soil Sciences Department Chair and Professor, R. Koenig; School of Economic Sciences Director and Professor, A. Love; Plant Pathology Director and Professor, S. Hulbert; Horticulture Department Chair and Professor, R. Koenig; Entomology Department Chair and Professor, S. Sheppard; School of Food Science Director and Professor, B. Rasco; Regents Professor, J. Reganold; Professors, J. Davenport, A. Felsot, M. Flury, L. Fox, J. Harsh, P. Jacoby, V. McCracken, M. Neff, H. Pappu; Associate Professors, L. Carpenter-Boggs, A. Carter, J. Goldberger, C. Peace, T. Peever, M. Pumphrey, N. Rayapati; Assistant Professors, M. Brady, I. Burke, C. Carraway, J. Cowan, D. Crowder, K. Murphy, J. Owen, K. Sanguinet; Instructors, J. Baser, C. Campbell, J. Durfey, J. Holden; Clinical Assistant Professor, M. Maquivar; Clinical Instructor, C. Perillo; Associate in Research, B. Jaeckel, Assistant Scientist, M. Quinn, Adjunct Scientist, D. Cobos, Information Systems Coordinator, R. Rupp.

Feed the world. Power the planet. Save the environment. It’s a tall order by any measure, but especially when you consider that experts predict that by 2050, the world population will grow to more than 9 billion human beings. At the center of the issue is the agricultural enterprise of the 21st Century. WSU’s Agricultural and Food Systems degree program focuses on vital aspects of agricultural and food systems ranging from plant and animal production to marketing and education. This innovative program provides students with what they need to build or work in a modern food system that is productive, competitive and sustainable.

Delivered collaboratively by departments within the College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences, the AFS program provides foundational education in a wide array of disciplines, including crop and soil sciences, horticulture, entomology, plant pathology, and economics. Students can choose among five Bachelor of Science degree majors: Agricultural Education; Agricultural Technology and Production Management; Agricultural and Food Business Economics; Agriculture and Food Security; and Organic Agriculture Systems. The college offers a minor in Agricultural Systems, which is specifically designed to complement a major in Communications, for students interested in careers in the communications sector of the agricultural industry. The college also offers an interdisciplinary Master of Science in Agriculture degree, an undergraduate Certificate in Organic Agriculture, and a graduate Certificate in Sustainable Agriculture.

In order to certify in an AFS major, a student must have a minimum of 24 credits with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. For complete information about all majors within the AFS degree programs, please see the AFS webpage at: http://afs.wsu.edu.

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural and Food Systems (Pullman campus)

Systems not silos. The AFS degree program emphasizes the highly integrated nature of the science disciplines involved in growing food. All students take a core set of courses designed to provide them with a broad interdisciplinary background as well as the decision making skills they’ll need to succeed and excel in the workplace.

Capstone course.  At the end of their program, all students take AFS 401, a capstone course designed specifically to provide a culminating experience to help in preparing students to be “job-ready, day one”. Guest lectures from industry professionals challenge students on topics including developing your personal brand, project management, sales 101, private agricultural business ownership and succession planning, and the performance review process. A fundamental part of the capstone experience is a team-based, semester-long project where small groups of students each work on addressing an emerging issue or problem and providing recommendations to one of several industry partners (co-ops, private companies, etc.). Students meet regularly with industry partners (face-to-face, videoconference, phone) to define their project, collect research information and develop a project plan. They prepare meeting agendas, take minutes and report back to instructors to identify what worked, what did not work, and what changes they plan to make for the next meeting. Besides introducing students to their business and colleagues, industry partners provide in-house research background information, assist in distributing employee surveys and provide excellent professional mentoring for students. At the end of the semester, student teams provide both a comprehensive written report and an oral presentation about their project and industry recommendations both to their peers and to industry leaders.

In addition to WSU’s Six Learning Goals of the Baccalaureate, graduates with a major in AFS will be able to:

  1. Identify and understand the interaction among key components that comprise agricultural and food systems across disciplines.
  2. Obtain, evaluate, and apply scholarly information to expand understanding and knowledge-base of the systems.
  3. Apply scientific and quantitative reasoning to address real world problems in agricultural and food systems.
  4. Consider, evaluate, and integrate varying perspectives on issues related to agricultural and food systems.
  5. Integrate ethical, economic, environmental, and cultural/societal contexts at the global and/or local level.
  6. Communicate effectively to a broad range of audiences using appropriate traditional and emerging technological media. 
  7. Appreciate the breadth and depth of professional opportunities in agricultural and food systems.

The hands-on possibilities with the AFS degree are numerous. Students are encouraged to participate in undergraduate research projects, work as part-time employees with research and extension personnel, study abroad, and/or participate in professional internships to put their classroom training to work. Learn, lead, and connect through the Center for Transformational Learning and Leadership (http://ctll.cahnrs.wsu.edu).  Student clubs also provide a variety of ways to interact with peers, faculty, and staff within the college, yet another way to enrich the educational experience (http://cahnrs.wsu.edu/academics/Student-life/clubs/).

Scholarships

Scholarships for AFS majors are available on a competitive basis, and are awarded based on ability, need, and interest in a career path in associated professions (http://cahnrs.wsu.edu/academics/scholarships/).

Transfer Students

Students planning to transfer into the AFS program should take courses that meet the University Common Requirements (UCORE) and the AFS core requirements when possible. Transfer articulation agreements have been developed with several Washington community colleges degree programs. More information can be found on our Transfer Student website: http://cahnrs.wsu.edu/academics/transfer/. Prospective transfer students are strongly encouraged to consult with an advisor within the AFS program for further guidance.

Graduate Studies

Master of Science in Agriculture (Pullman and Global Campus)

This advanced degree program focuses on the agricultural professional, practitioner, and educator to meet the growing need for prepared individuals to apply new and emerging technologies and science to the advancement of agriculture. This degree offers professionals already working in the field the opportunity to continue their education while they continue employment either inside or outside of the Pullman area. Students may elect to customize their program or choose from three options: General Agriculture, Food Science and Management, or Plant Health Management (online only).  Access complete program description on-line at: http://msag.wsu.edu/.

Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are also offered in Crop Science, Economics, Entomology, Food Science, Horticulture, Plant Pathology, and Soil Science. More information can be found on the CAHNRS Graduate Studies website: http://cahnrs.wsu.edu/academics/graduate-studies/.

 




Schedules of Studies

Honors students complete the Honors College requirements which replace the UCORE requirements.


Agricultural and Food Business Economics (120 Hours)

The Agricultural and Food Business Economics major gives students what they need to succeed in the food and agricultural business world – knowledge of business and economics practices as well as a deep understanding of animal, plant, and food systems. Graduates in this major are highly qualified to fill positions ranging from market researcher to product analyst to food broker in a variety of venues, including private industry, commercial farms and ranches, government agencies, production agriculture, and universities.
First Year
First TermHours
ANIM SCI 1013
ECONS 101 [SSCI] or 102 [SSCI]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
HORT / CROP SCI 102 3
MATH 20113
Second TermHours
[COMM] Course (COM 102 [COMM] or H D 205 [COMM] recommended)3 or 4
ECONS 101 or 1023
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
Humanities [HUM]3
MATH 202 [QUAN]13
Second Year
First TermHours
AFS 1013
CHEM 101 [PSCI] or 105 [PSCI]4
Diversity [DIVR]3
STAT 212 or MGTOP 2154
Second TermHours
ACCTG 2303
AFS 2013
CHEM 102 or 1064
Creative & Professional Arts [ARTS]3
SOIL SCI 201 [BSCI]3
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermHours
AFS Core Systems Elective23
BIOLOGY 1204
ECONS 3013
ECONS 35033
Electives3
Second TermHours
BIOLOGY 1064
ECONS 3023
ECONS 311 [M]3
ECONS 3353
Electives3
Fourth Year
First TermHours
300-400-level Electives6
CROP SCI 3603
ECONS 452 [M]3
Second TermHours
300-400-level Electives3
AFS 401 [CAPS]3
ECONS 450 [M] or 4533
ECONS 451 3
Electives4

Footnotes
1An alternative to MATH 201 is MATH 106, 172, or 220. An alternative to MATH 202 is MATH 171.
2AFS Core Systems Electives: AGTM 310, ANIM SCI 464 [M], 472 [M], 474 [M], BIOLOGY 372 [M], CROP SCI 302, ECONS 351, HORT 320, NATRS 300, SOIL SCI 368, or other systems courses approved by your advisor.
3ECONS 352, which is only offered in the spring, may be used as an alternative for ECONS 350.

Agricultural Education (129 Hours)

Combining the best of both agriculture and teaching, the Agricultural Education major prepares students to educate the next generation of agricultural leaders and consumers. Highly sought after by employers, they teach high school and middle school agricultural science classes, as well as serve as FFA advisors, adult education instructors, community outreach coordinators, university extension agents, etc.

This major requires students to complete the AFS core courses and agricultural education required courses, as well as a series of teaching and learning courses to meet initial teacher certification requirements. Students also spend a semester student teaching in an agricultural education program in a Washington high school.
First Year
First TermHours
ANIM SCI 1013
CHEM 101 [PSCI] or 105 [PSCI]4
ECONS 101 [SSCI]3
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
HORT / CROP SCI 102 3
Second TermHours
AGTM 2013
CHEM 102 or 1064
ENGLISH 201 [WRTG], 301 [WRTG] or 302 [M]13
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
STAT 212 [QUAN], MATH 140 [QUAN], 171 [QUAN], or 202 [QUAN]3 or 4
Complete West B Exam
Second Year
First TermHours
300-400-level Ag Elective23
AFS 1013
BIOLOGY 120 [BSCI]4
Creative & Professional Arts [ARTS]3
TCH LRN 301 3
Certify in College of Education
Second TermHours
AFS 2013
BIOLOGY 106 or 1074
Diversity [DIVR]3
Humanities [HUM]3
SOIL SCI 2013
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third TermHours
TCH LRN 317 (Available summer only)2
Third Year
First TermHours
300-400-level Ag Elective23
CROP SCI 3603
ECONS 35033
TCH LRN 4643
TCH LRN 4653
TCH LRN 4662
Second TermHours
AFS 401 [CAPS]3
AGTM 4023
ED PSYCH 4683
TCH LRN 467 [M]3
TCH LRN 4692
TCH LRN 4703
Fourth Year
First TermHours
300-400-level Ag Elective23
AFS Core Systems Elective43
AG ED 440 [M] 2
AG ED 4503
AG ED 4712
Second TermHours
AG ED 4078
TCH LRN 4158

Footnotes
1One from ENGLISH 201, 301, 302 [M] or 402 is required for admission to the Teacher Education Program. Students who take ENGLISH 302 will need to take an additional [WRTG] or [COMM] course.
2The Agricultural upper-division electives are required for teacher certification in Agricultural Education. Any 300-400-level course with one of the following CAHNRS subjects: AGTM, AFS, ANIM SCI, CROP SCI, ECONS, ENTOM, ENIVR SCI, FS, HORT, IPM, LND ARCH, NATRS, PL P, SOIL SCI, or VIT ENOL not used to satisfy major requirements can be accepted to fulfill this requirement.
3ECONS 352, which is only offered in the spring, may be used as an alternative for ECONS 350.
4AFS Core Systems Electives: AGTM 310, ANIM SCI 464 [M], 472 [M], 474 [M], BIOLOGY 372 [M], CROP SCI 302, ECONS 351, HORT 320, NATRS 300, SOIL SCI 368, or other systems courses approved by your advisor.

Agricultural Technology and Production Management (120 Hours)

Students in this hands-on major gain a science-based overview of agriculture and food systems, with an emphasis on the practical application of technology to agricultural production systems. The program combines students’ inherent creativity and interest in physical and biological sciences, technology, mathematics, business, and related subjects with their desire to develop innovative solutions to a variety of agricultural problems.

Areas of application include precision agricultural operations and services, management of agricultural businesses, production operations, sales, and promotional work in domestic and international agricultural communities. Graduates are prepared to own, operate, and manage their own enterprises or to provide services for private or governmental entities.
First Year
First TermHours
ANIM SCI 1013
CHEM 101 [PSCI] or 105 [PSCI]4
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
HORT / CROP SCI 102 3
Electives2
Second TermHours
CHEM 102 or 106 4
ECONS 101 [SSCI]3
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
SOIL SCI 201 [BSCI]3
STAT 212 [QUAN]4
Second Year
First TermHours
AFS 1013
AGTM 3053
AGTM 3143
BIOLOGY 1204
Humanities [HUM]3
Second TermHours
[COMM] Course (COM 102 [COMM] or H D 205 [COMM] recommended)3 or 4
ACCTG 230 3
AFS 2013
BIOLOGY 106 or 1074
Creative & Professional Arts [ARTS]3
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermHours
AFS 33613
AGTM 3153
CROP SCI 305, 403, ENTOM 343, or PL P 42923
CROP SCI 3603
ECONS 35033
Second TermHours
AGTM 3303
AGTM 4123
Diversity [DIVR]3
ECONS 450 [M] or [M] Elective43
MGMT 301 or Elective43
Fourth Year
First TermHours
400-level Business or Elective43
AFS Core Systems Elective53
AGTM 4511
MKTG 360 or Elective43
Electives2
Second TermHours
AFS 401 [CAPS]3
AGTM 4052
AGTM 4163
ENGLISH 402 [M]3
Electives3

Footnotes
1NATRS 312 can be taken in the spring as an alternative to AFS 336.
2ENTOM 351 can be taken in the spring as an alternative to the other courses listed.
3ECONS 352, which is only offered in the spring, may be used as an alternative for ECONS 350.
4Completion of a Business minor is recommended. Working with their advisors, students are encouraged to apply electives towards a minor of their choice.
5AFS Core Systems Electives: AGTM 310, ANIM SCI 464 [M], 472 [M], 474 [M], BIOLOGY 372 [M], CROP SCI 302, ECONS 351, HORT 320, NATRS 300, SOIL SCI 368, or other systems courses approved by your advisor.

Agriculture and Food Security (120 Hours)

Students in this major are the protectors of the world’s plant-based food supply. The Agriculture and Food Security major prepares students to manage plant pests and diseases from a holistic perspective.

Students learn to understand the complexity of relationships within agricultural ecosystems, how external factors influence these systems, and how to effectively manage pests and diseases without incurring undue risks to human or environmental health. Course offerings begin with a strong scientific base in biology and chemistry, and expand to focus on crop science, soil science, integrated pest management, and plant pathology.

The major is an exciting blend of classroom instruction and field experience that is tailored to the eventual employment goals of the student. Graduates who can evaluate and diagnose pest and plant disease problems and recommend economically and ecologically sound ways to correct them are in great demand. Excellent employment opportunities exist with state, federal, and international agricultural, environmental, and regulatory agencies, agrichemical companies, agricultural and environmental consulting firms, food processing, forest product, and vegetable and seed companies, and a wide range of other agribusiness enterprises.
First Year
First TermHours
ANIM SCI 1013
CHEM 101 [PSCI] or 105 [PSCI]4
ECONS 101 [SSCI]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
HORT / CROP SCI 1023
Second TermHours
[COMM] Course (COM 102 [COMM] or H D 205 [COMM] recommended)3 or 4
CHEM 102 or 1064
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
HORT / CROP SCI 2024
Second Year
First TermHours
AFS 1013
BIOLOGY 107 [BSCI] or 120 [BSCI]4
Diversity [DIVR]3
Humanities [HUM]3
SOIL SCI 2013
Second TermHours
AFS 2013
BIOLOGY 1064
Creative & Professional Arts [ARTS]3
ENTOM 3513
STAT 212 [QUAN]4
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermHours
CROP SCI 3053
CROP SCI 3603
ECONS 35013
ENTOM 343 [M]3
Electives3
Second TermHours
AFS Core Systems Elective23
IPM 4523
SOIL SCI/AFS 302 [M]33
Electives6
Fourth Year
First TermHours
AFS 3363
CROP SCI 4033
PL P 3002
PL P 4293
Electives3
Second TermHours
400-500-level Seminar in CAHNRS41
AFS 401 [CAPS]3
SOIL SCI 4413
Electives6

Footnotes
1ECONS 352, which is only offered in the spring, may be used as an alternative for ECONS 350.
2AFS Core Systems Electives: AGTM 310, ANIM SCI 464 [M], 472 [M], 474 [M], BIOLOGY 372 [M], CROP SCI 302, ECONS 351, HORT 320, NATRS 300, SOIL SCI 368, or other systems courses approved by your advisor.
3SOIL SCI 414 and 415 can be taken as an alternative to SOIL SCI 302 [M]. However another [M] course will be required.
4400-500-level Seminar: AGTM 451, CROP SCI/SOIL SCI 412, HORT/VIT ENOL 409, or as approved by advisor.

Organic Agriculture Systems (120 Hours)

Significantly different than conventional agriculture, organic food production is one of the fastest growing segments of agriculture, with retail sales increasing by 20 percent annually since 1991. In many ways, Washington State has been a leader in this burgeoning new industry. This revolutionary new major is the first of its kind to be offered in the United States. Students in this major take a diverse array of courses in the natural, environmental, economic, and social sciences, as well as a number of courses focused on organic production practices.

Students wanting a hands-on degree experience thrive in the organic major. WSU has over a four-acre certified organic teaching farm where students learn to produce certified organic vegetables, fruit, herbs, and flowers that they distribute through local food banks, on-campus food service, a 100-member CSA (community supported agriculture), and a local farmers’ market. Students have the opportunity to tailor their program of study to specific areas of emphasis, such as organic animal and dairy production, economics and marketing, crop production, food science, pest management, soil management, etc. in consultation with their advisor.

The Organic Agriculture Program at WSU prepares students to work on or develop their own organic farm. It also prepares students for employment opportunities with nonprofit organizations and government agencies involved in environmental and food safety, as well as private-sector food processing, marketing, organic certification, and product development industries.
First Year
First TermHours
ANIM SCI 1013
CHEM 101 [PSCI] or 105 [PSCI]4
ECONS 101 [SSCI]3
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
HORT / CROP SCI 1023
Second TermHours
CHEM 102 or 1064
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
HORT / CROP SCI 2024
SOIL SCI 1013
Second Year
First TermHours
AFS 1013
BIOLOGY 107 [BSCI] or 120 [BSCI]4
Humanities [HUM]3
STAT 212 [QUAN]4
Second TermHours
[COMM] Course (COM 102 [COMM] or H D 205 [COMM] recommended)3 or 4
AFS 2013
BIOLOGY 1064
Creative & Professional Arts [ARTS]3
SOIL SCI 2013
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermHours
BIOLOGY 1403
CROP SCI 305 or PL P 4293
CROP SCI 3603
ENTOM 343 [M]3
Horticulture Production Elective13
Second TermHours
AFS 4453
ECONS 35223
ENTOM 3513
SOIL SCI 302 [M]33
SOIL SCI 4983
Fourth Year
First TermHours
AFS 3363
AFS Core Systems Elective43
CROP SCI 4033
Diversity [DIVR]3
Electives3
Second TermHours
AFS 401 [CAPS]3
CROP SCI / SOIL SCI 4121
SOIL SCI 4413
SOIL SCI 4806
Electives2

Footnotes
1Horticulture Production Electives: HORT 310, HORT 313, HORT 357 (spring), or as approved by advisor.
2ECONS 350, which is only offered in the fall, may be used as an alternative for ECONS 352.
3SOIL SCI 414 and 415 can be taken as an alternative to SOIL SCI 302 [M]. However another [M] course will be required.
4AFS Core Systems Electives: AGTM 310, ANIM SCI 464 [M], 472 [M], 474 [M], BIOLOGY 372 [M], CROP SCI 302, ECONS 351, HORT 320, NATRS 300, SOIL SCI 368, or other systems courses approved by your advisor.


Minors

Agricultural Systems

The minor in Agricultural Systems requires a minimum of 18 hours, 9 of which must be upper-division and taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.  The requirements are 6 hours from ANIM SCI 101, AFS 101, CROP SCI/HORT 102, and SOIL SCI 101; 3 hours from CROP SCI/HORT 202, ECONS 101 and SOIL SCI 201; and 3 hours each from three of four areas: Biotic Influences on Crop Production, Economic Aspects of Agricultural Systems, Sustainability, and Production.  See department for an approved list of courses.



Certificates

Organic Agriculture (Online and in Pullman)

The Certificate in Organic Agriculture is an 18-credit undergraduate program that can be taken along with a major in another field, or as a stand-alone educational experience. The certificate is ideal for professionals working in agriculture or related fields who require in-depth knowledge of organic systems, those wanting to pursue a career in organic agriculture, anyone interested in beginning a community-supported agriculture (CSA) enterprise, home gardeners, as well as current WSU students in other majors at WSU with an interest in organic agriculture.  Students develop knowledge and skills that are applicable to industries and agencies involved in the food chain-from production, processing, and delivery to policy, regulation, and education.

      The 18-credit certificate program is designed with 3 core courses (9 credit hours) required for all students, 3 credit hours of “experiential learning”, plus a minimum of 6 additional credit hours (electives) selected from a range of courses. All courses already exist as permanent courses, and the certificate can be fulfilled through on-line delivery or in-class participation on the Pullman campus.

     Requirements:  Core:  9 credit hours from SOIL SCI 101, 201, and 302 (cross-listed as AFS 302);  Experimental Learning:  3 credit hours from SOIL SCI 480 (for on-campus students) or 498 (for online students);  Electives:  6 credit hours from AFS 445, BIOLOGY 140, CROP SCI 102, 360, 443, CRS 336, ECONS 101, 102, or SOIL SCI 441.


Sustainable Agriculture

The Graduate Certificate in Sustainable Agriculture provides post-baccalaureate students with an interdisciplinary understanding of practices and current issues in sustainable agriculture, along with the science that makes it work.  Students who earn the Graduate Certificate in Sustainable Agriculture may take these skills into all industries and agencies involved in the food chain; from production, processing, and delivery to policy, regulation, and education. Students in any WSU graduate degree program are eligible for the certificate if they meet the prerequisites of the courses needed for the certificate. Students pursuing a graduate certificate may only accumulate 6 credits toward a master’s degree and 9 credits towards a Ph.D. degree.

Students not in degree programs are also eligible to earn the certificate by enrolling as non-degree students, again providing that they meet the prerequisites of the courses needed for the certificate. Apply for admission to an academic department, indicating your intention to be classified as a part-time, certificate graduate student.



Courses

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective. Courses showing two entries of the same number indicate that the course information is changing. The most recently approved version is shown first, followed by the older version, in gray, with its last-effective term preceding the course title. Courses shown in gray with only one entry of the course number are being discontinued. Course offerings by term can be accessed by clicking on the term links when viewing a specific campus catalog.


Agricultural And Food Systems (AFS)

(Select Campus to see schedule links)


101 Introduction to Agricultural and Food Systems 3 Introduction to the disciplines and integration of the fields of agriculture, food production, manufacturing and distribution to define and solve real-world problems. Typically offered Fall.

101 (Effective through Fall 2017) Introduction to Agricultural and Food Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 101 or concurrent enrollment; HORT 102 or concurrent enrollment. Introduction to the disciplines and integration of the fields of agriculture, food production, manufacturing and distribution to define and solve real-world problems. Typically offered Fall.

102 Professional Development in the Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences 1 Professional skill development with an emphasis on behavior, goal setting, internship selection, and building a portfolio. Typically offered Fall.

103 Field Experience in Agricultural and Food Systems 1 Professional development with hands on experience through interactive class sessions and field trips with faculty and external partners. Two field trips required. Typically offered Spring.

201 Systems Skills Development for Agricultural & Food Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: AFS 101; ANIM SCI 101; CROP SCI 102; ECONS 101. Development of tools and skills in building, evaluating and applying model systems in agricultural production, food manufacturing and distribution in rural society and society as a whole; focus on the types of systems, construction and analysis. Typically offered Spring.

250 Civic Engagement in Sustainable Food Systems 2 Introduction to sustainable food systems through lecture, discussion, and engagement. Spring Break field trip required. Typically offered Spring.

302 [M] Introduction to Agroecology 3 Agroecological crop production through case study analyses and applications of ecological principles in traditional and modern farming systems. (Crosslisted course offered as SOIL SCI 302, AFS 302). Recommended preparation: SOIL SCI 201. Typically offered Spring.

302 (Effective through Fall 2017) [M] Introduction to Agroecology 3 Agroecological crop production through case study analyses and applications of ecological principles in traditional and modern farming systems. (Crosslisted course offered as SOIL SCI 302, AFS 302). Recommended preparation: SOIL SCI 201. Typically offered Spring.

336 [SSCI] Agriculture, Environment, and Community 3 Course Prerequisite: 3 credits [S] or [K] GER, or [SSCI] UCORE; sophomore standing. Sociological perspectives on major agrifood trends, alternative agrifood movements, and impacts on human communities and the natural environment. Typically offered Fall.

350 Food Systems in Western Washington 3 Course Prerequisite: CROP SCI/HORT 102; ECONS 101; SOIL SCI 201. Introduction to local and regional food systems unique to western Washington with an emphasis on the farm-to-table processes of foods and beverages. (Course offered as HORT 350, AFS 350). Typically offered Odd Years - Fall.

401 [CAPS] Advanced Systems Analysis and Design in Agricultural and Food Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: AFS 201; STAT 212 or 412; junior standing. Problem solving methodologies as applied to integrated agricultural systems analysis and design problems; strong emphasis on teamwork. Typically offered Spring.

445 Field Analysis of Sustainable Food Systems 3 Experiential course visiting farms, food processing and marketing sites to develop understanding of issues in food systems sustainability. Field trip required. Credit not granted for both AFS 445 and 545. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

483 Special Topics in Study Abroad V 2-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Interdisciplinary course that integrates experiential learning activities in agricultural food systems in an international context. Typically offered Summer Session.

501 Current Research in Organic and Sustainable Agriculture 3 Multidisciplinary framework to assess the sustainability of a range of farming and food systems. Typically offered Even Years - Fall.

511 Statistical Methods for Graduate Researchers 4 (3-2) Fundamentals of experimental design and statistical methods for graduate students in the sciences. Covers t-test for one and two means, ANOVA through completely randomized designs with one and two factors, chi-square tests and regression analysis using R. Recommended preparation: One prior course in statistics. Cannot be used for credit in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics graduate programs. (Crosslisted course offered as STAT 511, AFS 511). Typically offered Fall and Spring.

545 Field Analysis of Sustainable Food Systems 3 Experiential course visiting farms, food processing and marketing sites to develop understanding of issues in food systems sustainability. Field trip required. Credit not granted for both AFS 445 and 545. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

590 Sociology of Agriculture and Food Systems 3 Theories, concepts, debates, and methods associated with the sociology of agriculture and food systems. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.


Agricultural Education (AG_ED)

(Select Campus to see schedule links)


110 Introduction to Agricultural Education 2 Introduction to Agricultural Education Model, requirements for becoming an agricultural teacher; roles of the agricultural teacher. Typically offered Fall.

342 Methods of Teaching Agriculture 3 Course Prerequisite: TCH LRN 303; admitted to teacher education (Secondary Education). Methods and strategies for teaching agricultural science.

407 Student Teaching in Agricultural Education V 4-16 Course Prerequisite: AG ED 450; AG ED 442; AG ED 471. Supervised teaching in public schools including seminars reflecting effective teaching. Required preparation: Includes applying; paying certification fees; completing all other coursework for degree and teacher certification; receiving fingerprint clearance from WSP, FBI, and Office of Professional Practices; maintaining 2.5 GPA overall and in endorsement and professional core classes. Placement by interview only. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

430 Reinforcing Core Academics in Agricultural Education 4 (3-3) Strategies of reinforcing core academics in secondary agricultural education. This course leads to CASE certification. Typically offered Spring.

440 [M] Principles of Career and Technical Education V 2-3 Course Prerequisite: TCH LRN 464 or concurrent enrollment; TCH LRN 465 or concurrent enrollment; TCH LRN 466 or concurrent enrollment. Local, state, and national vocational technical educational legislation, policies, programs, and organizations. Typically offered Fall.

442 Program Planning in Agricultural Education 2 Organization and management of a total vocational agricultural program.

450 Planning, Curriculum, and Techniques in Ag Ed 3 Course Prerequisite: TCH LRN 301; TCH LRN 317; admitted to teacher education (Secondary Education). Focus on career and technical education program planning, curriculum development, and instructional techniques for agricultural education programs. Typically offered Fall.

471 Student Organizations in Agricultural Education 2 Course Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment AG ED 450. Role of Future Farmers of America (FFA) in student organizations; role of advisor; principles of leadership; characteristics of successful FFA chapters. Course equivalent to OSU's Ag 421/521. Typically offered Fall.

497 Internship in Agricultural Education V 2-12 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Course Prerequisite: By interview only. Off-campus professional experience. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

504 Special Topics in Vocational Education V 1-3 Special topics in agricultural education or agriculture that will provide advanced training for teachers of agriculture.

508 Foundations of Vocational Education 3 Historical, philosophical, social, political and economic factors that influence education in vocational environments. Typically offered Summer Session.

511 Seminar in Career and Technical Education V 1-2 Seminar addressing new and emerging legislation and educational programs in vocational education.


General Agriculture (AGRI)

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501 Agriculture Master's Practicum V 2-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program in Masters of Science in Agriculture. Course individually designed to provide practical participation/experience under professional supervision in areas related to student's specialization.

502 Graduate Seminar 3 Presentations and discussions of contemporary issues, trends, and recent research and development by graduate students, faculty, and visiting scholars.

560 Contemporary Issues in Agricultural Technology and Policy 3 Contemporary issues in agricultural technology and policy implications.

562 Advanced Topics V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Directed group study of selected advanced topics in agriculture and related areas. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

587 Research and Extension in Agriculture 3 Ways to effectively communicate research and extension information to diverse audiences; and to plan and assess effective extension programs. Typically offered Fall and Summer.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.


Agricultural Technology And Management (AGTM)

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201 Metal Fabrication 3 (1-6) Credit not granted for students who have already completed AGTM/ENGR 202, 203, or 204. Theory, applications, and practices of welding, machining, and associated techniques in fabricating with metals. (Crosslisted course offered as AGTM 201, ENGR 201). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

202 Welding 1 (1-3) Credit not granted for students who have already completed AGTM/ENGR 201. Theory application and practices of welding and associated techniques in fabricating with metals. One of 3 two-week sessions of Metal Fabrication. Each session includes 3 hours lecture and 12 hours lab per week. (Crosslisted course offered as AGTM 202, ENGR 202). Typically offered Summer Session.

203 Machining 1 (1-3) Credit not granted for students who have already completed AGTM/ENGR 201. Theory application and practices of machining and associated techniques in fabricating with metals. One of 3 two-week sessions of Metal Fabrication. Each session includes 3 hours lecture and 12 hours lab per week. (Crosslisted course offered as AGTM 203, ENGR 203). Typically offered Summer Session.

204 Metal Fabrication 1 (1-3) Credit not granted for students who have already completed AGTM/ENGR 201. Theory application and practices of cutting and associated techniques in fabricating with metals. One of 3 two-week sessions of Metal Fabrication. Each session includes 3 hours lecture and 12 hours lab per week. (Crosslisted course offered as AGTM 204, ENGR 204). Typically offered Summer Session.

305 Agricultural Precision Systems 3 (2-3) Systems for precision agriculture, equipment, software uses, principles, construction, care, tillage, planting, spraying, harvesting, and materials handling machinery. Field trips required. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

310 Small Engine Maintenance and Repair 3 (2-3) Safety, operation, maintenance, and troubleshooting engines; understanding of engine systems and components including compression, carburetion, cooling, fuel, and lubrication. Typically offered Fall.

314 Agricultural Power Units and Mobile Electrical Systems 3 (2-3) Principles of thermodynamics, engine cycles, transmissions, electrical, starting, braking, steering, suspension systems, differentials and hydraulic systems. Typically offered Fall.

315 Irrigation Systems and Water Management 3 (2-3) Principles of irrigation and drainage, water measurement, irrigation methods and practices, selection of irrigation system components. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

330 Electrical Power Systems for Agriculture 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Methods of selecting and installing electrical power circuits in agricultural operations; light frame construction; motor and control circuits; Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs). Typically offered Spring.

402 Methods, Materials, and Machines for Teaching Ag Mechanics 3 Course Prerequisite: AGTM 201. Development of shop programs in project planning, demonstrations, and skills performance; safety and management of materials, tools, and machines. Typically offered Spring.

405 Advanced Agricultural Precision Systems 2 (1-3) Course Prerequisite: AGTM 305. Advanced principles of precision agricultural systems, software uses, management of controllers on equipment, geographical information systems and global positioning systems. Typically offered Spring.

412 Human and Machinery Risk Management 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. History and current status of farm worker injury prevention programs in the US including worker's compensation insurance. Typically offered Spring.

416 Fluid Power Systems 3 (2-3) Fluid power principles applied to the selection, design, operation, and management of agricultural and industrial machinery. Field trips required. Typically offered Spring.

444 Teaching Practicum 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 3 hours. Course Prerequisite: By instructor permission. Laboratory and research techniques for AgTM. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

451 Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Readings and interviews, research, and oral presentation of professional subjects. Typically offered Fall.

481 Independent Research V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 8 hours. Course Prerequisite: By instructor permission. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

495 Internship in Agricultural Technology and Management V 2-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: sophomore standing; prior approval of internship coordinator and advisor required. Work experience related to academic learning. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

Student Affairs Schedules of Classes Commencement Veteran's Affairs Summer Session
 
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